Gdansk

 

Stutthof


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Today village Sztutowo, during the World War II was called Stutthof, and housed first concentration camp outside pre-war German borders. Opened at 2 of September 1939 was liberated in May 1945, which makes it the longest working Nazi camp.

Malbork


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From the period of Teutonic Knights rule origin the biggest and the best known medieval castle in Poland. It is one of Poland's UNESCO list objects, and a must-see for every tourist visiting northern part of the country.

Gdansk City


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Gdansk is the biggest Polish sea port, the city with reach history and active present. For years it was an independent “Free Town of Gdansk”, but it is strongly connected with the most important moments of Polish history.

Artus Court


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The custom of building Artus courts came to Poland from England, supposed home of this legendary king. Originally it was meeting place for knights and nobles, in Gdansk it was more for wealthy merchants and city politics.

Dluga street and Long Market


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Gdańsk is an untypical city without exact main square in old town. Instead, it has a main street, Długa (Long street), which broadens in front of Town Hall, changes name to Long Market, and lead ahead to the Moltawa river. That street gathers the most important city monuments, as well as shops and restaurants.

St. Mary's Church


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The St. Mary Church is the biggest brick church in the world, and one of the biggest of all brick buildings. Located in a very centre of the Old Town, is the most important Gdansk church.

Old Crane (Zuraw)


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Old Crane (in polish Żuraw), is a harbour mechanism, which helped with ships embarking. It is the part of Wide Gate, one of water gates of Gdańsk.

Oliwa District


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Oliwa district is now a part of Gdansk, but for long time was separate town. Its history began in 1186, from the foundation of Cistercian monastery. The small church in Romanesque style, built for monks only, quickly had to be extended. In 14th century the new, Gothic church was developed, and after the war...

Monument of Fallen Shipyard Workers


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In December 1970 in Poland, especially in Gdańsk and Gdynia, had place one of the most important strikes against communist government. The regime used a force, and about 40 young people died.

Westerplatte Memorial


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Westerplatte, the peninsula in Gdańsk, was attacked at the first of September 1939, and this event is considered as a beginning of World War II. For Poles it is a symbol of the greatest heroism, present in every history book.

Sopot


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Sopot is a part of urban area called Tricity, together with Gdańsk and Gdynia, which are really closely located and connected by many issues. The smallest of them, Sopot is still worth visiting, especially for its two centuries long fame as a seaside resort.
 
 
 

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